Eduardo Telles - Turtle Guard Sweeps and Attacks

Eduardo Telles - Turtle Guard Sweeps and Attacks

Nobody has used the turtle guard in competitive jiu-jitsu more effectively than Eduardo Telles. Eduardo hails from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. His martial arts career began as a young teenager with karate. At about the age of 17, his karate school began teaching jiu-jitsu. Eduardo’s first instructor was Fernando Yamasaki, whose brother is UFC referee, Mario Yamasaki.
- Issue 41

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Eduardo Telles - Turtle Guard Sweeps and Attacks
  • Steamroller - Eduardo Telles

    The Steamroller is an excellent option for when you’re turtled up and your opponent is attempting to lock up a seatbelt control or go for a choke. For this technique demonstration, Eduardo explains to us that although he does have some takedowns that he uses, he typically will start matches by pu...

  • Turtleplata - Eduardo Telles

    This is a great option that Eduardo likes should his opponent block the Steamroller by basing out, or post his foot on the mat.
    - Issue 41

  • Leg Trap from Turtle Guard to Side Control - Eduardo Telles

    When you see this technique performed in real speed, you’ll be amazed at how simple it looks. When it was demonstrated on me, I was dumbfounded at how easy it was and why I had never thought about it before [All the more reason to subscribe to Jiu-Jitsu Magazine with access to all of our techniqu...

  • Leg Trap Fail to Back Drag - Eduardo Telles

    Let’s say you go for the leg trap, but your opponent bases out with his leg or knee at just the right time and stuffs the attempt. This is what you do!
    - Issue 41

  • Knee Bar from Turtle Guard - Eduardo Telles

    I didn’t start going for leg attacks until I had my purple belt. Early on, I was a little reluctant to just go for it because oftentimes I’d have to give up a position I was comfortable with to go for the kneebar. When I saw this technique, I thought it was great because you gave up nothing. Even...

  • Clock Choke Defense to Side Control - Eduardo Telles

    A very common attack on someone that’s turtled up is to attack the collar by reaching between the neck and shoulder and going for what will eventually be a clock choke.
    - Issue 41